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Terms and Policy

Rights and Privacy Notices
It is our privilege to serve you and our duty to honor your rights and protect your personal health information. Below you will find information regarding rights and privacy. We can change the terms of this notice, and the changes will apply to all information we have about you. The new notice will be available upon request, in our office, and on our web site.

SUMMARY OF THE FLORIDA PATIENT’S BILL OF RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Florida law requires that your health care provider or health care facility recognize your rights
while you are receiving care and that you respect the health care provider’s or health care
facility’s right to expect certain behavior on the part of patients. You may request a copy of the full text
of this law from your health care provider or health care facility. A summary of your rights and
responsibilities follows:
A patient has the right to be treated with courtesy and respect, with appreciation of his or her
individual dignity, and with protection of his or her need for privacy.
A patient has the right to a prompt and reasonable response to questions and requests.
A patient has the right to know who is providing medical services and who is responsible for his
or her care.
A patient has the right to know what patient support services are available, including whether an
interpreter is available if he or she does not speak English.
A patient has the right to know what rules and regulations apply to his or her conduct.
A patient has the right to be given by the health care provider information concerning diagnosis,
planned course of treatment, alternatives, risks, and prognosis.
A patient has the right to refuse any treatment, except as otherwise provided by law.
A patient has the right to be given, upon request, full information and necessary counseling on the
availability of known financial resources for his or her care.
A patient who is eligible for Medicare has the right to know, upon request and in advance of
treatment, whether the health care provider or health care facility accepts the Medicare assignment rate.
A patient has the right to receive, upon request, prior to treatment, a reasonable estimate of
charges for medical care.
A patient has the right to receive a copy of a reasonably clear and understandable, itemized bill
and, upon request, to have the charges explained.
A patient has the right to impartial access to medical treatment or accommodations, regardless of
race, national origin, religion, physical handicap, or source of payment.
A patient has the right to treatment for any emergency medical condition that will deteriorate from
failure to provide treatment.
A patient has the right to know if medical treatment is for purposes of experimental research and
to give his or her consent or refusal to participate in such experimental research.
A patient has the right to express grievances regarding any violation of his or her rights, as stated
in Florida law, through the grievance procedure of the health care provider or health care facility which
served him or her and to the appropriate state licensing agency.
A patient is responsible for providing to the health care provider, to the best of his or her
knowledge, accurate and complete information about present complaints, past illnesses, hospitalizations,
medications, and other matters relating to his or her health.
A patient is responsible for reporting unexpected changes in his or her condition to the health care
provider.
A patient is responsible for reporting to the health care provider whether he or she comprehends a
contemplated course of action and what is expected of him or her.
A patient is responsible for following the treatment plan recommended by the health care provider.
A patient is responsible for keeping appointments and, when he or she is unable to do so for any
reason, for notifying the health care provider or health care facility.
A patient is responsible for his or her actions if he or she refuses treatment or does not follow the
health care provider’s instructions.
A patient is responsible for assuring that the financial obligations of his or her health care are
fulfilled as promptly as possible.
A patient is responsible for following health care facility rules and regulations affecting patient
care and conduct.

HIPAA: Your Health Information Is Protected By Federal Law
​Most of us believe that our medical and other health information is private and should be protected, and we want to know who has this information. The Privacy Rule, a Federal law, gives you rights over your health information and sets rules and limits on who can look at and receive your health information. The Privacy Rule applies to all forms of individuals' protected health information, whether electronic, written, or oral. The Security Rule is a Federal law that requires security for health information in electronic form.
What Information Is Protected by The Privacy Rule?
Information your doctors, nurses, and other health care providers put in your medical record
Conversations your doctor has about your care or treatment with nurses and others
Information about you in your health insurer’s computer system
Billing information about you at your clinic
Most other health information about you held by those who must follow these laws

What Information is Protected by The Security Rule?
Electronic Protected Health Information. The HIPAA Privacy Rule protects the privacy of individually identifiable health information, called protected health information (PHI), as explained in the Privacy Rule and here. The Security Rule protects a subset of information covered by the Privacy Rule, which is all individually identifiable health information a covered entity creates, receives, maintains or transmits in electronic form. The Security Rule calls this information “electronic protected health information” (e-PHI).3 The Security Rule does not apply to PHI transmitted orally or in writing.


Grievances and The Grievance Process
​If you are unhappy with any of your mental health services, you may file a grievance with our CEO, Ms. Thelma Carter.

You can either call or send a letter telling us about your grievance. An answer to your first level grievance will be offered in a letter. This should take no longer than 30 days. If the first grievance cannot be resolved within 30 calendar days, an additional 14 calendar day extension can be provided if requested by you or if we have justified upon request to the Agency for Health Care Administration a need for additional information and how the delay is in your best interest. If there is a delay you will be notified of the delay in a letter. If your grievance is not resolved, you may request a second level grievance within 90 days of the first resolution letter. We have 30 more days to resolve the second grievance with the same rules for any necessary extensions. The entire grievance process should take no longer than 90 days. If you are not satisfied with our decision, you may file a 3rd grievance directly with the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration.

If you have any questions about filing a grievance, we are happy to help. For more information. contact our CEO,
Dr. Thelma Carter, PhD.
​3900 W Commerical Blvd. Suite 210, Tamarac, Florida 33309, 954.644.9567, HealingArtsInstituteSFL@yahoo.com

Health Insurance Portability And Accountability Act (HIPAA)​
Your Information. Your Rights. Our Responsibilities.

This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information. Please review it carefully.
Healing Arts Institute of South Florida, Inc. Your Rights You have the right to:
Get a copy of your paper or electronic medical record
Correct your paper or electronic medical record
Request confidential communication
Ask us to limit the information we share
Get a list of those with whom we’ve shared your information
Get a copy of this privacy notice
Choose someone to act for you
File a complaint if you believe your privacy rights have been violated
Your Choices You have some choices in the way that we use and share information as we:
Tell family and friends about your condition
Provide disaster relief
Include you in a hospital directory
Provide mental health care
Market our services and sell your information
Raise funds
Our Uses and Disclosures We may use and share your information as we:
Treat you
Run our organization
Bill for your services
Help with public health and safety issues
Do research
Comply with the law
Respond to organ and tissue donation requests
Work with a medical examiner or funeral director
Address workers’ compensation, law enforcement, and other government requests
Respond to lawsuits and legal actions
Your Rights
When it comes to your health information, you have certain rights. This section explains your rights and some of our responsibilities to help you.
Get an electronic or paper copy of your medical record
You can ask to see or get an electronic or paper copy of your medical record and other health information we have about you. Ask us how to do this.
We will provide a copy or a summary of your health information, usually within 30 days of your request. We may charge a reasonable, cost-based fee.
Ask us to correct your medical record
You can ask us to correct health information about you that you think is incorrect or incomplete. Ask us how to do this.
We may say “no” to your request, but we’ll tell you why in writing within 60 days.
Request confidential communications
You can ask us to contact you in a specific way (for example, home or office phone) or to send mail to a different address.
We will say “yes” to all reasonable requests.
Ask us to limit what we use or share
You can ask us not to use or share certain health information for treatment, payment, or our operations. We are not required to agree to your request, and we may say “no” if it would affect your care.
If you pay for a service or health care item out-of-pocket in full, you can ask us not to share that information for the purpose of payment or our operations with your health insurer. We will say “yes” unless a law requires us to share that information.
Get a list of those with whom we’ve shared information
You can ask for a list (accounting) of the times we’ve shared your health information for six years prior to the date you ask, who we shared it with, and why.
We will include all the disclosures except for those about treatment, payment, and health care operations, and certain other disclosures (such as any you asked us to make). We’ll provide one accounting a year for free but will charge a reasonable, cost-based fee if you ask for another one within 12 months.
Get a copy of this privacy notice
You can ask for a paper copy of this notice at any time, even if you have agreed to receive the notice electronically. We will provide you with a paper copy promptly.
Choose someone to act for you
If you have given someone medical power of attorney or if someone is your legal guardian, that person can exercise your rights and make choices about your health information.
We will make sure the person has this authority and can act for you before we take any action.
File a complaint if you feel your rights are violated
You can complain if you feel we have violated your rights by contacting us using the information on page 1.
You can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights by sending a letter to 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20201, calling 1-877-696-6775, or visiting www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/complaints/.
We will not retaliate against you for filing a complaint.

Your Choices
​For certain health information, you can tell us your choices about what we share. If you have a clear preference for how we share your information in the situations described below, talk to us. Tell us what you want us to do, and we will follow your instructions.
In these cases, you have both the right and choice to tell us to:
Share information with your family, close friends, or others involved in your care
Share information in a disaster relief situation
Include your information in a hospital directory
If you are not able to tell us your preference, for example if you are unconscious, we may go ahead and share your information if we believe it is in your best interest. We may also share your information when needed to lessen a serious and imminent threat to health or safety.
In these cases we never share your information unless you give us written permission:
Marketing purposes
Sale of your information
Most sharing of psychotherapy notes
In the case of fundraising:
We may contact you for fundraising efforts, but you can tell us not to contact you again.

Our Uses and Disclosures How do we typically use or share your health information? We typically use or share your health information in the following ways.
Treat you
We can use your health information and share it with other professionals who are treating you.
Example: A doctor treating you for an injury asks another doctor about your overall health condition.

Run our organization
We can use and share your health information to run our practice, improve your care, and contact you when necessary.
Example: We use health information about you to manage your treatment and services.

Bill for your services
We can use and share your health information to bill and get payment from health plans or other entities.

Example: We give information about you to your health insurance plan so it will pay for your services.

How else can we use or share your health information? We are allowed or required to share your information in other ways – usually in ways that contribute to the public good, such as public health and research. We have to meet many conditions in the law before we can share your information for these purposes. For more information see: www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/index.html.
Help with public health and safety issues
We can share health information about you for certain situations such as:
Preventing disease
Helping with product recalls
Reporting adverse reactions to medications
Reporting suspected abuse, neglect, or domestic violence
Preventing or reducing a serious threat to anyone’s health or safety
Do research
We can use or share your information for health research.
Comply with the law
We will share information about you if state or federal laws require it, including with the Department of Health and Human Services if it wants to see that we’re complying with federal privacy law.
Respond to organ and tissue donation requests
We can share health information about you with organ procurement organizations.
Work with a medical examiner or funeral director
We can share health information with a coroner, medical examiner, or funeral director when an individual dies.
Address workers’ compensation, law enforcement, and other government requests
We can use or share health information about you:
For workers’ compensation claims
For law enforcement purposes or with a law enforcement official
With health oversight agencies for activities authorized by law
For special government functions such as military, national security, and presidential protective services
Respond to lawsuits and legal actions
We can share health information about you in response to a court or administrative order, or in response to a subpoena.
Our Responsibilities
We are required by law to maintain the privacy and security of your protected health information.
We will let you know promptly if a breach occurs that may have compromised the privacy or security of your information.
We must follow the duties and privacy practices described in this notice and give you a copy of it.
We will not use or share your information other than as described here unless you tell us we can in writing. If you tell us we can, you may change your mind at any time. Let us know in writing if you change your mind.
For more information see: www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/noticepp.html.
Changes to the Terms of this Notice We can change the terms of this notice, and the changes will apply to all information we have about you. The new notice will be available upon request, in our office, and on our web site.
Other Instructions for Notice
This notice is effective as of 2015/10/10
Our privacy official is our CEO, Dr. Thelma Carter, PhD., 3900 W Commercial Blvd. Suite 210, Tamarac, Florida 33309, 954.644.9567, HealingArtsInstituteSFL@yahoo.com
Note that Florida rules adding additional layers of security or for the protection of minors (reporting of abuse, disclosures required to parents) may affect your rights regarding information privacy.

Florida 0394.459: Client Bill of Rights
The 2015 Florida Statutes Title XXIX
PUBLIC HEALTH
Chapter 394 
MENTAL HEALTH
View Entire Chapter

394.459 Rights of patients.--
(1) RIGHT TO INDIVIDUAL DIGNITY.--It is the policy of this state that the individual dignity of the patient shall be respected at all times and upon all occasions, including any occasion when the patient is taken into custody, held, or transported. Procedures, facilities, vehicles, and restraining devices utilized for criminals or those accused of crime shall not be used in connection with persons who have a mental illness, except for the protection of the patient or others. Persons who have a mental illness but who are not charged with a criminal offense shall not be detained or incarcerated in the jails of this state. A person who is receiving treatment for mental illness shall not be deprived of any constitutional rights. However, if such a person is adjudicated incapacitated, his or her rights may be limited to the same extent the rights of any incapacitated person are limited by law.
(2) RIGHT TO TREATMENT.--
(a) A person shall not be denied treatment for mental illness and services shall not be delayed at a receiving or treatment facility because of inability to pay. However, every reasonable effort to collect appropriate reimbursement for the cost of providing mental health services to persons able to pay for services, including insurance or third-party payments, shall be made by facilities providing services pursuant to this part.
(b) It is further the policy of the state that the least restrictive appropriate available treatment be utilized based on the individual needs and best interests of the patient and consistent with optimum improvement of the patient’s condition.
(c) Each person who remains at a receiving or treatment facility for more than 12 hours shall be given a physical examination by a health practitioner authorized by law to give such examinations, within 24 hours after arrival at such facility.
(d) Every patient in a facility shall be afforded the opportunity to participate in activities designed to enhance self-image and the beneficial effects of other treatments, as determined by the facility.
(e) Not more than 5 days after admission to a facility, each patient shall have and receive an individualized treatment plan in writing which the patient has had an opportunity to assist in preparing and to review prior to its implementation. The plan shall include a space for the patient’s comments.
(3) RIGHT TO EXPRESS AND INFORMED PATIENT CONSENT.--
(a)1. Each patient entering treatment shall be asked to give express and informed consent for admission or treatment. If the patient has been adjudicated incapacitated or found to be incompetent to consent to treatment, express and informed consent to treatment shall be sought instead from the patient’s guardian or guardian advocate. If the patient is a minor, express and informed consent for admission or treatment shall also be requested from the patient’s guardian. Express and informed consent for admission or treatment of a patient under 18 years of age shall be required from the patient’s guardian, unless the minor is seeking outpatient crisis intervention services under s. 394.4784. Express and informed consent for admission or treatment given by a patient who is under 18 years of age shall not be a condition of admission when the patient’s guardian gives express and informed consent for the patient’s admission pursuant to s. 394.463 or s.394.467.
2. Before giving express and informed consent, the following information shall be provided and explained in plain language to the patient, or to the patient’s guardian if the patient is 18 years of age or older and has been adjudicated incapacitated, or to the patient’s guardian advocate if the patient has been found to be incompetent to consent to treatment, or to both the patient and the guardian if the patient is a minor: the reason for admission or treatment; the proposed treatment; the purpose of the treatment to be provided; the common risks, benefits, and side effects thereof; the specific dosage range for the medication, when applicable; alternative treatment modalities; the approximate length of care; the potential effects of stopping treatment; how treatment will be monitored; and that any consent given for treatment may be revoked orally or in writing before or during the treatment period by the patient or by a person who is legally authorized to make health care decisions on behalf of the patient.
(b) In the case of medical procedures requiring the use of a general anesthetic or electroconvulsive treatment, and prior to performing the procedure, express and informed consent shall be obtained from the patient if the patient is legally competent, from the guardian of a minor patient, from the guardian of a patient who has been adjudicated incapacitated, or from the guardian advocate of the patient if the guardian advocate has been given express court authority to consent to medical procedures or electroconvulsive treatment as provided under s. 394.4598.
(c) When the department is the legal guardian of a patient, or is the custodian of a patient whose physician is unwilling to perform a medical procedure, including an electroconvulsive treatment, based solely on the patient’s consent and whose guardian or guardian advocate is unknown or unlocatable, the court shall hold a hearing to determine the medical necessity of the medical procedure. The patient shall be physically present, unless the patient’s medical condition precludes such presence, represented by counsel, and provided the right and opportunity to be confronted with, and to cross-examine, all witnesses alleging the medical necessity of such procedure. In such proceedings, the burden of proof by clear and convincing evidence shall be on the party alleging the medical necessity of the procedure.
(d) The administrator of a receiving or treatment facility may, upon the recommendation of the patient’s attending physician, authorize emergency medical treatment, including a surgical procedure, if such treatment is deemed lifesaving, or if the situation threatens serious bodily harm to the patient, and permission of the patient or the patient’s guardian or guardian advocate cannot be obtained.
(4) QUALITY OF TREATMENT.--
(a) Each patient shall receive services, including, for a patient placed under s. 394.4655, those services included in the court order which are suited to his or her needs, and which shall be administered skillfully, safely, and humanely with full respect for the patient’s dignity and personal integrity. Each patient shall receive such medical, vocational, social, educational, and rehabilitative services as his or her condition requires in order to live successfully in the community. In order to achieve this goal, the department is directed to coordinate its mental health programs with all other programs of the department and other state agencies.
(b) Facilities shall develop and maintain, in a form accessible to and readily understandable by patients and consistent with rules adopted by the department, the following:
1. Criteria, procedures, and required staff training for any use of close or elevated levels of supervision, of restraint, seclusion, or isolation, or of emergency treatment orders, and for the use of bodily control and physical management techniques.
2. Procedures for documenting, monitoring, and requiring clinical review of all uses of the procedures described in subparagraph 1. and for documenting and requiring review of any incidents resulting in injury to patients.
3. A system for investigating, tracking, managing, and responding to complaints by persons receiving services or individuals acting on their behalf.
(c) A facility may not use seclusion or restraint for punishment, to compensate for inadequate staffing, or for the convenience of staff. Facilities shall ensure that all staff are made aware of these restrictions on the use of seclusion and restraint and shall make and maintain records which demonstrate that this information has been conveyed to individual staff members.
(5) COMMUNICATION, ABUSE REPORTING, AND VISITS.--
(a) Each person receiving services in a facility providing mental health services under this part has the right to communicate freely and privately with persons outside the facility unless it is determined that such communication is likely to be harmful to the person or others. Each facility shall make available as soon as reasonably possible to persons receiving services a telephone that allows for free local calls and access to a long-distance service. A facility is not required to pay the costs of a patient’s long-distance calls. The telephone shall be readily accessible to the patient and shall be placed so that the patient may use it to communicate privately and confidentially. The facility may establish reasonable rules for the use of this telephone, provided that the rules do not interfere with a patient’s access to a telephone to report abuse pursuant to paragraph (e).
(b) Each patient admitted to a facility under the provisions of this part shall be allowed to receive, send, and mail sealed, unopened correspondence; and no patient’s incoming or outgoing correspondence shall be opened, delayed, held, or censored by the facility unless there is reason to believe that it contains items or substances which may be harmful to the patient or others, in which case the administrator may direct reasonable examination of such mail and may regulate the disposition of such items or substances.
(c) Each facility must permit immediate access to any patient, subject to the patient’s right to deny or withdraw consent at any time, by the patient’s family members, guardian, guardian advocate, representative, Florida statewide or local advocacy council, or attorney, unless such access would be detrimental to the patient. If a patient’s right to communicate or to receive visitors is restricted by the facility, written notice of such restriction and the reasons for the restriction shall be served on the patient, the patient’s attorney, and the patient’s guardian, guardian advocate, or representative; and such restriction shall be recorded on the patient’s clinical record with the reasons therefor. The restriction of a patient’s right to communicate or to receive visitors shall be reviewed at least every 7 days. The right to communicate or receive visitors shall not be restricted as a means of punishment. Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed to limit the provisions of paragraph (d).
(d) Each facility shall establish reasonable rules governing visitors, visiting hours, and the use of telephones by patients in the least restrictive possible manner. Patients shall have the right to contact and to receive communication from their attorneys at any reasonable time.
(e) Each patient receiving mental health treatment in any facility shall have ready access to a telephone in order to report an alleged abuse. The facility staff shall orally and in writing inform each patient of the procedure for reporting abuse and shall make every reasonable effort to present the information in a language the patient understands. A written copy of that procedure, including the telephone number of the central abuse hotline and reporting forms, shall be posted in plain view.
(f) The department shall adopt rules providing a procedure for reporting abuse. Facility staff shall be required, as a condition of employment, to become familiar with the requirements and procedures for the reporting of abuse.
(6) CARE AND CUSTODY OF PERSONAL EFFECTS OF PATIENTS.--A patient’s right to the possession of his or her clothing and personal effects shall be respected. The facility may take temporary custody of such effects when required for medical and safety reasons. A patient’s clothing and personal effects shall be inventoried upon their removal into temporary custody. Copies of this inventory shall be given to the patient and to the patient’s guardian, guardian advocate, or representative and shall be recorded in the patient’s clinical record. This inventory may be amended upon the request of the patient or the patient’s guardian, guardian advocate, or representative. The inventory and any amendments to it must be witnessed by two members of the facility staff and by the patient, if able. All of a patient’s clothing and personal effects held by the facility shall be returned to the patient immediately upon the discharge or transfer of the patient from the facility, unless such return would be detrimental to the patient. If personal effects are not returned to the patient, the reason must be documented in the clinical record along with the disposition of the clothing and personal effects, which may be given instead to the patient’s guardian, guardian advocate, or representative. As soon as practicable after an emergency transfer of a patient, the patient’s clothing and personal effects shall be transferred to the patient’s new location, together with a copy of the inventory and any amendments, unless an alternate plan is approved by the patient, if able, and by the patient’s guardian, guardian advocate, or representative.
(7) VOTING IN PUBLIC ELECTIONS.--A patient who is eligible to vote according to the laws of the state has the right to vote in the primary and general elections. The department shall establish rules to enable patients to obtain voter registration forms, applications for absentee ballots, and absentee ballots.
(8) HABEAS CORPUS.--
(a) At any time, and without notice, a person held in a receiving or treatment facility, or a relative, friend, guardian, guardian advocate, representative, or attorney, or the department, on behalf of such person, may petition for a writ of habeas corpus to question the cause and legality of such detention and request that the court order a return to the writ in accordance with chapter 79. Each patient held in a facility shall receive a written notice of the right to petition for a writ of habeas corpus.
(b) At any time, and without notice, a person who is a patient in a receiving or treatment facility, or a relative, friend, guardian, guardian advocate, representative, or attorney, or the department, on behalf of such person, may file a petition in the circuit court in the county where the patient is being held alleging that the patient is being unjustly denied a right or privilege granted herein or that a procedure authorized herein is being abused. Upon the filing of such a petition, the court shall have the authority to conduct a judicial inquiry and to issue any order needed to correct an abuse of the provisions of this part.
(c) The administrator of any receiving or treatment facility receiving a petition under this subsection shall file the petition with the clerk of the court on the next court working day.
(d) No fee shall be charged for the filing of a petition under this subsection.
(9) VIOLATIONS.--The department shall report to the Agency for Health Care Administration any violation of the rights or privileges of patients, or of any procedures provided under this part, by any facility or professional licensed or regulated by the agency. The agency is authorized to impose any sanction authorized for violation of this part, based solely on the investigation and findings of the department.
(10) LIABILITY FOR VIOLATIONS.--Any person who violates or abuses any rights or privileges of patients provided by this part is liable for damages as determined by law. Any person who acts in good faith in compliance with the provisions of this part is immune from civil or criminal liability for his or her actions in connection with the admission, diagnosis, treatment, or discharge of a patient to or from a facility. However, this section does not relieve any person from liability if such person commits negligence.
(11) RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN TREATMENT AND DISCHARGE PLANNING.--The patient shall have the opportunity to participate in treatment and discharge planning and shall be notified in writing of his or her right, upon discharge from the facility, to seek treatment from the professional or agency of the patient’s choice.
(12) POSTING OF NOTICE OF RIGHTS OF PATIENTS.--Each facility shall post a notice listing and describing, in the language and terminology that the persons to whom the notice is addressed can understand, the rights provided in this section. This notice shall include a statement that provisions of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act apply and the name and telephone number of a person to contact for further information. This notice shall be posted in a place readily accessible to patients and in a format easily seen by patients. This notice shall include the telephone numbers of the Florida local advocacy council and Advocacy Center for Persons with Disabilities, Inc.
History.--s. 5, ch. 71-131; s. 3, ch. 73-133; s. 25, ch. 73-334; s. 2, ch. 74-233; s. 202, ch. 77-147; s. 1, ch. 78-434; s. 12, ch. 79-3; s. 4, ch. 79-298; s. 10, ch. 79-320; s. 1, ch. 80-171; s. 7, ch. 82-212; s. 6, ch. 84-285; s. 27, ch. 85-167; s. 1, ch. 88-307; s. 16, ch. 88-398; s. 11, ch. 90-347; s. 1, ch. 91-170; s. 71, ch. 95-143; s. 706, ch. 95-148; s. 7, ch. 96-169; s. 210, ch. 96-406; s. 9, ch. 2000-263; s. 64, ch. 2000-349; s. 2, ch. 2004-385; s. 3, ch. 2005-65.
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